The Scoop on Scoop.it

About a month ago I was invited by my colleague Gabi to join Scoop.it.  Her Scoop.it topic is Open Learning News. I could see that her own blog posts and tweets were getting more traffic and retweeting after she began to use Scoop.it. So I decided to give it a try.

I had set up Google Reader to pull in my chosen RSS feeds quite awhile ago, but somehow I didn’t faithfully go and check it. I seemed to be stuck on the fast pace of Twitter. Scoop.it feels like a cross between Google Reader, Twitter, and a blog. With Scoop.it, you choose a topic unique to you and identify keywords pertaining to your topic. You look through the harvested blog posts and articles and select the ones you want to be part of your Scoop.it page by clicking on ‘Scoop.it’ on the chosen post. This process is referred to by Scoop.it as curating.  My topic is Future of Learning.  Have a look and see what you think!

Screenshot of Future of Learning on Scoop.it

I’ve found that I must wade through and discard lots of posts I don’t want on my page. Because my keywords include “podcast” and “ebook,” I get many posts advertising particular ebooks and podcasts. But amongst the dross there is much gold, discovered much more quickly and easily than I could have done without such a tool.

When I select a post for the page, I can also select to tweet it and/or put it on Facebook. I noticed that because I was tweeting my choices, my Twitter followers began to join Scoop.it and follow my topic. Best of all, Scoop.it allows comments on my chosen posts. Currently, on one of these posts with comments, I am arguing with Alan Cann about whether “one trick pony” e-readers will endure against the all-singing-all-dancing iPad. This is where Scoop.it emulates aspects of blogging. I can also pull my blog posts into my Scoop.it topic – I haven’t set that up but I will.

I’ve decided that I still need to blog, because I still need to compose my thoughts and put them into writing and commit them to the internet – the duty of every digital scholar. I will not allow Scoop.it to encourage me to become digitally lazy.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist

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