OERs by Video

I am preparing for a project in which I will need to make video open educational resources (OERs). I will be creating split-screen video clips of lectures showing the presenter on one side, and whatever she is demonstrating on the computer on the other side. I am trying to imitate some Open Yale lectures I have seen here. I’m pretty sure Open Yale is using some sort of hardware and software lecture-capture solution which I don’t have. My solution will be low-cost: I will film the presenter, and capture whatever she is presenting via some screencast software such as Quicktime Pro or Camtasia, and use the split-screen wizardry of Final Cut Express to create the final product. If you want to learn more about how that is done, see my blog post from last week.

The next wrinkle in the video OER saga is that some of the footage will contain unsavoury language, and some may contain images of vulnerable adults and minors. Therefore, I need to bleep out words and blur out faces. I found a great tutorial for the face-blurring here, and I embed below a very helpful tutorial on bleeping out unwanted words.

Final Cut Pro Tutorial: How To Bleep Out Words So Your Mama Doesn’t Hear It from Andy Coon on Vimeo.

These are new issues for me in the realm of creating OERs. These learning materials will be created for a very specific medical-related audience (I will reveal more when I have something to show), but because they will be open-access, they should reach unknown audiences and unforeseen uses. That’s the beauty of OER!

Terese Bird, CMALT

Learning Technologist and SCORE Research Fellow, University of Leicester

My so-called digital life: making split-screen video OER

It has been a while since I have written a blog post. I got busy; I got out of the habit. And yet I know how useful it is to write a blog post on what I’ve been learning lately, what I’ve been musing on, problems I’ve been trying to solve, conferences or events I have attended and learnt from. And so I am back, trying to get back into a good habit of digitally reflecting, as part of my so-called digital life. On Tuesday, I will be describing the benefits of blogging to a group of PhD students here at University of Leicester. And so, it’s time to start practicing what I preach.

Since I last wrote a blog post, I helped carry off Follow the Sun 2012, our very successful third online-only conference on the future of learning. I also earned my CMALT. Thank you, Association for Learning Technology! These are good to note. But what else have I been doing? Mainly, I have been building open educational resources (OER). I have done some for the history-focussed Manufacturing Pasts project. I will link to these and share them out when the website is ready, which should be in the next few weeks.

Intro to Final Cut Express by Techcast Focus

I have also been learning to use Final Cut Express, because I have to build OER out of a film of a presenter, combined with a film of what she is demonstrating on the computer. The best way I can think of do this, with the resources available to me, is to make a split-screen video comprised of the two films.  I am pretty good with iMovie, and decent with MovieMaker, but have never touched Final Cut Express. And so I went to YouTube for tutorials. I link above the first of a series of 5 very useful tutorials posted by Techcast Focus — I highly recommend these if you are just getting started in Final Cut Express.  I learnt how to do the split-screen process from this tutorial by oneironaut420. I plan to make the video of whatever is being demonstrated on the computer by a simple screencast — probably using Quicktime Pro if it can be done on a Mac, or on Camstudio or Debut if it must be Windows.

One main reason I decided to blog about this is that if I don’t, I will forget this technique. Blogging is my open research notebook.

Please comment on what you blog about, how you keep yourself going with blogging — or your own cool tips for building video OER!

Terese Bird, CMALT

Learning Technologist and SCORE Research Fellow, University of Leicester

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